How to Use Your Accomplishments to Earn a Promotion

If you feel you’ve made significant accomplishments in your current position, chances are you’re due for a raise or promotion. Oftentimes, the most common advice given from numerous sources is to collect data and have a conversation with your boss. While I agree with that advice, it’s rather vague and needs a little more elaboration.

In today’s post, I’ll share with you how to present your accomplishments in a meaningful way that will help you achieve the raise or promotion you deserve. Also check out my video for more details!

Tip 1: It’s all about the bottom line. When it comes to collecting and presenting data, you really want to quantify and analyze it, as well as take the time to write down your accomplishments. Think about how these achievements have helped or are helping the larger goals of the organization. If you can show that you added value to the bottom line, whether through additional revenue, an increase in sales, reducing expenses, or possibly lowering turnover, you can easily translate those achievements into bottom-line dollars for yourself.

Tip 2: Write it down and you won’t forget. There were times I started to say something and it wasn’t exactly what I wanted to say. Avoid this mistake by ensuring that the figures are right in front of you. This will easily show how your past accomplishments added value to your organization. When you take the time to write down your accomplishments, it will ensure that you won’t forget anything once you’re in the conversation. It can be nerve-wracking to meet with your manager regarding advancement and it’s usually because we aren’t used to having these conversations all the time. However, this reaction is completely normal. So if you take time to write down your accomplishments, you’ll have something you can share with your boss and you won’t forget what those accomplishments are, especially any specific data from those achievements because those figures really matter.

Bonus Tip: Focus on the future. Your past accomplishments don’t always mean you’re entitled to a raise. I advise adding some future value to your promotion plan.

Check out my other videos on how to get your ideas adopted or learn about my full Promotion Planning system where I teach you the 7 steps to building the perfect promotion plan, including how to approach your boss.

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Mary is a previous COO of a multi-million dollar company that she helped to start with no experience in the industry. As a leader, her greatest joy is seeing others reach a higher potential than they ever dreamed possible.

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If you feel you’ve made significant accomplishments in your current position, chances are you’re due for a raise or promotion. Oftentimes, the most common advice given from numerous sources is to collect data and have a conversation with your boss. While I agree with that advice, it’s rather vague and needs a little more elaboration.

In today’s post, I’ll share with you how to present your accomplishments in a meaningful way that will help you achieve the raise or promotion you deserve. Also check out my video for more details!

Tip 1: It’s all about the bottom line. When it comes to collecting and presenting data, you really want to quantify and analyze it, as well as take the time to write down your accomplishments. Think about how these achievements have helped or are helping the larger goals of the organization. If you can show that you added value to the bottom line, whether through additional revenue, an increase in sales, reducing expenses, or possibly lowering turnover, you can easily translate those achievements into bottom-line dollars for yourself.

Tip 2: Write it down and you won’t forget. There were times I started to say something and it wasn’t exactly what I wanted to say. Avoid this mistake by ensuring that the figures are right in front of you. This will easily show how your past accomplishments added value to your organization. When you take the time to write down your accomplishments, it will ensure that you won’t forget anything once you’re in the conversation. It can be nerve-wracking to meet with your manager regarding advancement and it’s usually because we aren’t used to having these conversations all the time. However, this reaction is completely normal. So if you take time to write down your accomplishments, you’ll have something you can share with your boss and you won’t forget what those accomplishments are, especially any specific data from those achievements because those figures really matter.

Bonus Tip: Focus on the future. Your past accomplishments don’t always mean you’re entitled to a raise. I advise adding some future value to your promotion plan.

Check out my other videos on how to get your ideas adopted or learn about my full Promotion Planning system where I teach you the 7 steps to building the perfect promotion plan, including how to approach your boss.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

Share:

Related Posts

The Top 10 Mistakes Women Make That are Sabotaging Their Advancement

In my mini e-book, you will learn how to avoid these mistakes and what to do instead to skyrocket your career now! 

Recent Posts

Categories

Mary is a previous COO of a multi-million dollar company that she helped to start with no experience in the industry. As a leader, her greatest joy is seeing others reach a higher potential than they ever dreamed possible.

More About Mary

Why Earning a Promotion Feels So Dang Hard …and What to Do Instead

Do you want your boss to finally recognize your hard work? Do you want a promotion? How about a raise year after year? Learn how to accelerate and elevate your career advancement with Mary’s FREE Masterclass. Click the button below to get instant access to this life-changing training!

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